Wednesday, July 1, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 26, Halfway: John PERRY Sr. & Sarah BETTERIDGE

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week's theme was The Old Homestead, and I wrote about the 1738 Terwilliger stone farm house near New Paltz, PA. This week, the theme is Halfway, as we're now half-way through the year.

And this week, I'm barely half-way through my research plans for the couple, John PERRY & Sarah BETTERIDGE!  I'm back at my son-in-law's genealogy line, looking for more details of his 3rd great-grandparents:  John PERRY, Sr., b. abt 1813, Hartshill, Warwick, England, in the Parish of Nuneaton, and his wife, Sarah BETTERIDGE, b. about the same year in Atherstone, Hartshill, Warwick.

We know his mother's name was Elizabeth, as she shows up widowed on later Census records, living with John, his wife Sarah, and children.  I have no information on Sarah's parents, as yet.

As listed in the Nuneaton Parish register, John married Sarah BETTERIDGE, b. abt 1814, Atherstone, Hartshill, Warwick, England, after the 3rd reading of Banns, 11 May 1834.

However, for some unknown reason, the same couple seem to have married once more, again after the 3rd reading of Banns, on 24 Jan 1836.  As before, both are "of this Parish" - Nuneaton.

I have no idea why the couple would have married once more... In this small community, I can't imagine there are two individuals with exactly the same names marrying.  I suppose it is possible, but it stretches possibilities. Did they NOT marry after the 3rd reading of the Banns in 1834?  Why not? What happened?  Their first child was born that year...

Regardless of their marriage date, they appear to have had the following children

  1.  Mary, b. abt 1834, d. 1844.
  2.  Robert, b. 1836
  3.  Elizabeth, b. 1839
  4.  John (jr.) [ancestor], b. July 1840, d. 14 Jan 1912, Atherstone, Hartshill;
             m. 15 Apr 1860 to Sarah WHITE (1836-1908); 9 children
  5.  James, b. 1844
  6.  Sarah, b. 1846
  7.  Hannah/Anne, b. 1849
  8.  Mary, b. abt 1851 [2nd child named Mary]

The 2nd-4th child were baptized at the same time: 26 Apr 1852; whereas the last 4 were baptized a year earlier on 23 Feb 1851.  This is another confusing set of events. Perhaps more research on church records may help make more sense of these dates.  Or, perhaps they baptized them as they could afford to-?  Anyone have more ideas?  The cost of baptizing?  Not the 'right' church?

The 1841 Census in Chapel End, Hartshill shows John and Sarah with their first 4 children, as well as John's widowed mother, Elizabeth Perry, 60 yrs.  Both John, as well as his mother, have their occupation listed as "Ribbon m" [maker]; Sarah is not listed as employed, and their children are listed as Mary 7, Robert 5, Elizabeth 3, and John 11 months.   Note that if Mary is 7, thus born in about 1834, it would seem to indicate the 1834 marriage is valid.

On the 1851 Census [Snowhill, Hartshill], Elizabeth is shown as Head, widowed, 72 yrs old, "Pauper. Former Weaver Ribbons Hand Looms."  Her birthplace is listed as Orton on the Hill, Leicester. A search on the map will show this is only about 15 km north, just across the border.  I'm not certain how I'll find her parents in Orton, but it might help if I can find a marriage record for about 1800...

I have hopes of finding more records, but there are over a dozen items on my research plan for this family. I am walking through Censuses and Parish registers, page by page by page.  John had 3 sons, and perhaps one was named for his own father, so I might focus on those names first.  Perhaps.

By next year, I hope to have more details to add to the PERRY family, and their female lines as well. The BETTERIDGE name is interesting, don't you think?  So many ancestors and ancestresses and so little time!

If you have more information on any of these people, do contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I'm always happy to correct any of my information!

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 25, The Old Homestead: TERWILLIGER house

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week's theme was Heirloom, and I wrote about the Terwilliger Souvenir Album which has its own blog by the same name. This week, the theme is The Old Homestead. We have very few such homesteads.  

One of the few examples of an old homestead in our family history is found in the TERWILLIGER family history.

Let's look at the TERWILLIGER Farm house - scroll down to the "Evert Terwilliger House" at the bottom of this Wikipedia page. This home, a stone house, was built in 1738, by the Platekill Creek, by Evert Terwilliger, eldest son of Jan Evertson TERWILLIGER & Sytie Jacobz VAN ETTEN. Note that Jan and Sytie had 12 children which included only one girl.  

In March 1716/7, Evert Terwilliger married Sara Freer. The house pictured above is built on the land she inherited from her parents, Hugo and Maia [LeRoy] Freer, Huguenots. The house shows the wide gabled porch running along the front, which is apparently a common architecture feature of the times.  

This house was apparently extended by Evert and Sara's son, Jonathan in 1764. Stones of the house are incised with initials of several family members, Terwilliger, and Freer. Many of the Terwilliger family members settled in and near Shawangunk, Ulster, NY, a little south of New Paltz. 

Our family's TERWILLIGER line goes through Evert's younger brother, Johannes TERWILLIGER, who married Katrina HEYPSE/Heaps, 6 Sep 1717.

The TERWILLIGER surname is a made-in-America surname, developed when the British took over New Amsterdam and the Dutch settlements in North America, in 1664. By 1690, the families were using a version, spelled in many various ways. Some of the early ones were "Der Villig"  "Ter Willig"  "Tervilge" and others.  The website of TERWILLIGERS IN AMERICA, Inc., has information for anyone attempting to research their Terwilliger line, of whichever spelling used. 

If you have information about the TERWILLIGER home, or families, I am happy to share, and also to correct any incorrect information which may be here. You can reach me at calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day.

Monday, June 15, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 24, Heirloom: TERWILLIGER SOUVENIR ALBUM

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week's theme was Wedding, but I didn't follow the theme.  This week, the theme is Heirloom.

We have very few 'heirlooms' in our family, when I compare with other friends... No pieces of furniture, interesting sets of dishes, clocks from far away lands, jewellery, books signed by my ancestors, letters. No, there's none of that. But...

The biggest 'heirloom' I have and hold, is the incredible TERWILLIGER SOUVENIR ALBUM, from my great-grandfather, James Grover "Grove" TERWILLIGER.  He is my mother's mother's father, and this line goes back to when our original settlers arrived in New Amsterdam in 1663, on the ship "Arent" [the Eagle].  Note the vertical wall boundary on the right - this, I believe, is the site of Wall Street! 

To the right is a photo of the old, worn, Album. I am very grateful to have received excellent guidance in keeping the album 'comfortable' in order to reduce the deterioration. One day, perhaps, I might be able to pay for an Archivist to assist in protecting it further. Items in the Album are dated from 1840-the very early 1900s.

Here is a link to my other blog, where I am very slowly inventorying every page of this Album. It's a slog. Sometimes I'm very excited or amused about the pages, other times, I have no idea why I'm doing this. There are pages towards the back which contain wonderful details leading me to more of my ancestors: the ORMSBEE relatives, more of the GRAVES and TREAT relatives. I want to dip and pick which pages to do, but the truth is, each page needs to follow logically and methodically, so that it is - in fact - inventoried. At the rate I'm going, it will take 5 more years! Ah well. One page at a time.  

Some pages include photos - here's one example, which I won't be getting to for many months. I have no idea who those people at the bottom of the page might be... not a clue. Dates? Names? Relationships? Reasons for the photos?  Are they related to the various ephemera on the same page, or randomly glued down? No idea. 


One page more or less in the middle of the Album which is particularly fascinating, is what I call his "Button Page".

Filled with various political buttons, this page has many names for political election compaigns, as well as other ephemera pinned to the page.  But there are many pages to go before I even begin to inventory this page.  And I'll likely need an American to help me with who's who when!

And, finally, here is the final 'page' - the inside back cover of the Album. Filled with newspaper articles, obituaries, and other details of people.  I had no idea who most of these individuals were until I began my genealogy searches.  I can hardly wait until I can inventory each one of those newspaper articles!  Not all are labelled with dates of the publication, nor with the publication title itself.  More research will be needed of course... Never-ending.  
If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below. I would love to learn more about my various ancestors. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 23, Wedding (NOT) : George HUDSON, 1680-1748

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week's theme was Commencement / Beginnings.  This week, the theme is Wedding and I'm writing about... NOT Weddings.  I couldn't find any wedding photos or wedding stories, nor is there any particular tradition/history about weddings. On the other hand, here is Bangor Church where the children of George HUDSON were likely married, in Pennsylvania!   

I've chosen to write about George HUDSON/HUTTSON, who emigrated from Wales to Pennsylvania, possibly along with the MORGAN family (Thomas MORGAN). George was the 8th of the 9 known children attributed to Charles HUDSON and Joice/Joyce (unknown), in Pembrokeshire, Wales. There were only 2 girls in this family - another male-heavy line in the family. George HUDSON is my 6th (my children's 7th) great-grandfather. 

George married an unknown woman in Wales, who apparently died shortly after the birth of their fifth child.  Shortly afterwards, George married a second time to a Margret Griffith, but the couple had no further children. George and his first wife had the following children, all born in Pembrokeshire, Wales:
  1.  Charles, b.~1710, d. Jan 1748/9 in Pennsylvania; m. Mary Love in PA abt 1735, 3 boys
  2.  Nicholas [ancestor], b. ~1711/12, d. bef 9 Sep 1780 in PA; m. abt 1735 in PA to Jean/Jane BOWEN, 8 children (7 boys, 1 girl)
  3.  Joyce, b. ~1715; m. est 1730 to Even/Owen Hugh, 6 children (5 boys, 1 girl)
  4.  George jr., b. ~1718, d. 1747 PA; m. est 1740 in PA to Ann___; 2 children (1 each)
  5.  William, b. 1720, d. 1753 Evangeline Co., Louisiana; m. est 1746 LA to  Frances Morgan; 3 known children (2 boys, 1 girl)

This HUDSON family, written as Huttson at times, apparently immigrated sometime soon after 1720.  He was one of the earliest settlers in Caernarvon township.  George is listed as receiving a warrant for 400 acres of land reaching south from the King's Highway and west of the land of Gabriel Davies. An early map of Caernarvon township showing land boundaries may be seen in this link; scroll down, and under Lancaster county, select Caernarvon township. This is a wonderfully detailed map - I've spent hours poring over it! 

George left a very detailed will, apparently written on 09 Dec 1746 but not witnessed until 10 Jul 1747. A Codicil was added and then witnessed on 15 Sep 1747. The will was probated on 11 Apr 1748.  It lists the children, a number of grandchildren, describes his youngest son William as living in Louisiana, and other family details.  A transcription of the will may be found here.  The person transcribing the will used [sic] for all unusual or mis-spellings. Of course, spelling as we all know, was somewhat irrelevant at the time, and although correct, I find the constant [sic] quite intrusive to reading it.  I've taken each sentence and separated it, to clarify each item and each person in the family.

His will affirms that he and Margret had no children, as he states   "...she having no Child of her own nor neare relation in this Country...", and his will appears very generous in looking after her. Margret died before 3 Mar 1761, almost 13 years after George's death.

George provided funds to the Bangor church to build a stone wall surrounding it, plus yearly funds from his land estates to the church. The Bangor Episcopalian church, originally built around 1722, is a National Heritage building, and there is apparently a plaque inside the church mentioning him.   

Here is where more information may be found on the HUDSON, MORGAN, & other Welsh surnames in the interior area of Pennsylvania:  Click Link.  

If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below. I would love to learn more about my various ancestors. 


Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 22, Commencement/Beginnings: Resolved WHITE 1614 - abt 1687

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week, it was Military.  This week, the theme is Commencement / Beginnings:  I've chosen Resolved WHITE.     

Time to write about the Mayflower ancestors, eh? Some information may be found on The Mayflower History site, Wikipedia, and the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, among other sources.  The image on this page is of a postcard, published by Smith's Inc, Plymouth, Mass., about 1930-1945, displayed in Boston Public Library.

William & Susanna WHITE, and their two sons, Resolved, born in England [direct ancestor] and Peregrine, his younger brother, born in the Provincetown harbour, are on my children's father's lines. They link into the RICE line, first immigrant Deacon Edmund RICE, who arrived in the colony in 1632. Details of the Pilgrim's colony beginnings may be found on many sites, as noted above.

William & Susanna WHITE and 5 year-old Resolved had a very rocky start to their trip to New England. Note that the WHITE couple with their two servants were part of the London Merchant group, which boarded in London, then sailed to Leiden to add the congregation members as passengers. In Leiden, the other ship needed lengthy repairs, and the group in the Mayflower set off finally quite late in the season, early in September.  Here is an excellent set of sketches to show the inside of the ship, Mayflower.

Mentioned above, after arriving at safe harbour in Provincetown Harbour on November 9th, Susanna delivered a second son on board ship, whom they named Peregrine, at the end of November 1620. As all know who learn about the Mayflower group of settlers, their first winter was extremely challenging and approximately half of the crew and passengers died. On 21 Feb 1620/1, William WHITE died, leaving his wife and two children on their own.  

Three months later, 12 May 1621, Susanna married Edward Winslow, who had also been widowed, his wife having died two months earlier. It must have been amazingly challenging for this couple to manage. Each had been very recently widowed, and were determined to settle in this new country with extremely limited resources. Susanna and Edward went on to have five children, plus her two earlier children.  Edward Winslow served as Governor, Assistant Governor and, as the colony's agent in England. 

Resolved WHITE was born 9 Sep 1614, in England.  By the 1630s, he moved with his stepfather and mother to Marshfield, later moving to Scituate where he was granted 100 acres next to William VASSALL's land.

On 6 Nov 1640, he married Judith VASSALL, whose family (William VASSALL & Anna KING) had arrived in 1635.  William VASSALL was a founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony; he left the Colony and settled in Barbados - another story altogether! 

Resolved and Judith had the following nine children, born and baptized in Scituate:
  1. William, b. 10 Apr 1642, d. 24 Jan 1694/5
  2. John, b. 11 Mar 1643/4
  3. Sylvanus, b. 13 Mar 1645/6, d. as infant [not listed in some records]
  4. Samuel, b. 13 Mar 1645/6, d. between 1720-1731; m. Rebecca ___, abt 1667.
  5. Resolved [jr.], b. 12 Nov 1647, d. bef 27 Mar 1670
  6. Anna, bap 10 Jun 1649, d. 25 May 1714 Concord MA; m. abt 1670 to John Hayward.
  7. Elizabeth [ancestor], b. 10 Jun 1652/bap 4 Jul 1652, d. 27 Oct 1732 Concord MA; m. to Obadiah WHEELER on 17 Jul 1672; 9 children; Wheeler family arrived about 1639.
  8. Josiah, b. 29 Sep 1654/bap 14 Oct 1654, d. bef 5 Jun 1710; m. abt 1680 to Remember Read; 5 known children
  9. Susanna, b. Aug 1645/bap 9 Nov 1645
In 1656/7, Resolved and Judith - and likely, some of their children - travelled to Barbados, likely to aid in the settling of the estate of her father William who had settled there.

Resolved was made a Freeman of Plymouth County on June 1, 1658. By 1670, he was a Freeman of Marshfield.  He was actively involved in the early colony, and was a soldier in 1670, in King Philip's War. 

Judith, his wife, died by 3 Apr 1670 in Marshfield, aged 51 years.  On 5 Oct 1674, Resolved married for a second time to widow Abigail Lord [maiden name unknown].  Abigail died 27 Jun 1682, while they were living in Salem, where he had become a Freeman of Salem. 

After Abigail's death, Resolved moved back to Marshfield, likely living in the household of one of his children.  He is mentioned in a land transfer of his eldest son, William White, on 19 Sep 1687, and it is suggested that he died within a few years of this date. 

Resolved and his first wife Judith are buried in Winslow Cemetery in Marshfield. It is not known where his second wife, Abigail, is buried, nor when. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 21, MILITARY: Col. Jacob MORGAN, 1716-1792

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week, it was Black Sheep.  This week, the theme is Military, in keeping with the Memorial Weekend events in the USA [I'm Canadian].  

My 5th great-grandfather, Col. Jacob MORGAN, came to Pennsylvania from Wales with his parents, Thomas MORGAN & and Elizabeth ABREY, and his four older brothers, before 1718.  The Morgan family settled near Caernarvon township, in an area which includes the village of Morgantown which Col. MORGAN laid out in approximately 1779, after the Revolutionary War [about 1770, according to several accounts].  

Jacob MORGAN was born in Wales on 7 Nov 1716, and in 1739 he married Rachel PIERSOL [1723-1791], daughter of Richard PIERSOL and Bridget BROWN.  Jacob and Rachel had the following children, in Caernarvon PA:
  1. Rebecca, b. 1741; m. John Price
  2. Gen. Jacob jr., b. 1742, d. 18 Sep 1802; m. Barbara Leisure Jenkins; 6 children
  3. Benjamin, b. abt 1745;  m. 27 Jun 1793 to Harriett Ashton, 1 child known
  4. *Mary [ancestor], b. 20 Jun 1748, d. 1795; m. 20 Jun 1768 to John HUDSON, 7 children known
  5. Sarah, b. abt 1750; m. to Joseph Jenkins
  6. Frances, b. abt 1752 [not listed in his will]
  7. John, b. abt 1755
With both senior and junior versions of Jacob MORGAN men in Pennsylvania, both active in military duty at the General/Colonel level, there are some confusing details in histories of the region.  The pronoun 'he' without a clarifying detail such as each man's birthyear, makes it a small challenge. I have quoted details from the article "Genealogies of Pennsylvania Families" printed in Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol III, p 469. Additional details may be found in histories of Pennsylvania, and histories of families and individuals who fought in the two Wars in which he participated.

Jacob Sr. amassed a large amount of land over his years, inheriting about 400 acres from his father Thomas MORGAN when he died in 1740.  When Jacob died he owned over 5,000 acres of land.  

From 1755 to 1760, he was a Captain in the First Battalian of the Pennsylvania Regiment; later his company formed part of the Second Battalian, in the "Seven Years War" - the French/Indian Wars - receiving 3,000 acres for his service as Captain. He enlisted again in the Revolutionary War, June 1776 to Dec 1780, receiving the title of Colonel

He was commissioned as a Justice of the Peace and of the courts, during the period between 1764-1784. 
"From 22 May, 1777, until 8 January, 1781, he was Lieutenant of Berks County, with the rank of colonel, and as such, was at the head of military affairs in that county, and rendered constant and most valuable services to the cause of Independence."
Jacob and his wife, Rachel apparently moved to Philadelphia after 1784, where Rachel died 19 Dec 1791, aged 68.  

A year later, on 11 Nov 1792, Jacob died at the age of 76. He is buried in the cemetery of St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Morgantown, Caernarvon township, Berks, PA.  

If you have more information on the MORGAN family, including Jacob MORGAN Sr., please do not hesitate to contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below. I appreciate being corrected or having additional sources pointed out!  

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 20, Black Sheep: John GOODENOW (Capt.)

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog based on Themes. Last week, it was There's a Way.  This week, the theme is Black Sheep.  I don't think I have a Black Sheep in my ancestry... but there's one in my children's father's family line!

I'm writing about this ancestor because a very distant cousin recently asked for more information on the family line of GOODENOW.  Which immediately stimulated me to do more research on the line, of course. Does that happen to you as well?  Here's the bit of information I've been able to find so far on John GOODENOW (Capt.) - who wasn't quite as "good enough" as he should have been!  
   p. 100  ...Captain John Goodenow was forced to resign all offices because of his adultery, in 1697.

   p. 172  ...Publicly Goodenow had monopolized town offices and corruptly misused his power.  Privately, he had cheated at horse trading, been censured for drunkenness by his fellow church members, and attended only half the services.  What he did during the other services is implied in the complaint: "When he is absent from meeting the wife of John Brooks is absent also."  

   p. 172  ...John Brooks, economically vulnerable as a tenant of Goodenow, had complained that his landlord "had as much to do with his wife as himself and he wold beeer it no longer... he asked some of the company to go with him to demand his house from Capt Goodenow" but found no volunteers.  Another Sudbury housewife deposed that the man who was concurrently militia captain, town clerk, town assessor, first selectman, and moderator of the town meeting had lustfully "tempted me with the command of his estate... to committ adultery with him." 

Above excerpts taken from the book: Sex in Middlesex: Popular Mores in a Massachusetts County, 1649-1699, Roger Thompson, 1986, Univ of Massachusetts Press. 

John GOODENOW immigrated (aged 3) to Massachusetts on the ship, Confidence, in 1638, with his parents, Edmund and Anne, with younger brother Thomas (1 yr old).  The family were from Dunhead, Wiltshire, England, and came over with several other Goodenow families from other areas.

John GOODENOW married (1)  Mary AXTELL on 19 Sep 1656 in Sudbury, MA. Mary was bap 25 Sep 1639 in Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England.  She apparently had a very lengthy illness, before she died 14 Apr 1704.  John & Mary had the following 12 children, all born in Sudbury, MA:
  1. Hannah, b. 15 Dec 1657, d. 22 Nov 1691
  2. Mary, b. 19 Oct 1659, d. 2 Aug 1687
  3. Edmund, b. 16 Oct 1661, d. 31 May 1727
  4. Sarah, b. 26 Feb 1664, d. 1724
  5. Dorothy, b. abt 1668, m. John Peckham 9 Dec 1687
  6. John [jr], b. 9 Sep 1670, d. 24 Feb 1736
  7. Elizabeth, b. 18 Nov 1672, d. 9 May 1736
  8. *Joseph [ancestor], b. 1 Dec 1674, d. 3 Sep 1758; m. abt 1700 to Patience BENT 1700, 6 children known
  9. Ebenezar, b. 6 Jun 1677
  10. Lydia, b. 18 Oct 1678, d. 21 Apr 1679
  11. Mary/Mercy, b. 8 Nov 1680, d. 1 Sep 1710
John married for a second time to Mary Stone Walker (wid) in Dec 1705.  Mary (2nd wife), b. 22 Mar 1644 in Cambridge, MA, died in Sudbury, MA, aged 87, on 4 Nov 1731; this was 10 years after her husband's death.

On 6 Aug 1721, John GOODENOW, died 6 Aug 1721, aged 86, in Sudbury, MA. Eventually this GOODENOW line joins up with our RICE-LEWIS line.

I think I'd like to do more research on this black sheep, although I'm also distracted at looking at the origin of the surname GOODENOW, plus his 1st wife's unusual surname of AXTELL.  So many bright shiny objects to distract me with this couple!  

If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I would love to learn more about my children's ancestors, and appreciate any corrections or comments. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.



Thursday, May 14, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 19, There's A Way: Susanna PARSONS 1807-1866

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog, but based on Themes. Last week, it was Where There's A Will.  This week, the theme is There's a Way.
I chose to write about Susanna PARSONS, my son-in-law's 3rd great-grandmother and her family. Susanna was the third child (of 11 children) of parents, Richard PARSONS and Sarah CHETTEN [surname not proven as yet]. Richard is listed on the 1841 Census living in Snow Hill in the hamlet of Hartshill, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.  His occupation is listed as Ag Lab - agricultural labourer - as are his older sons.  

Susannah was baptised 7 Sep 1807 in St. Peter's church in the Parish of Mancetter, Warwick.  Susannah married Edwin WHITE in the on June 30th, 1828, also in the Parish 'mother' church, St. Peter's, built in the 13th Century. Edwin signed his name, while Susanna made her mark.  The Witnesses were Wm Henry Wright and Anne Ch....[difficult to read], who are not known to be relatives.

They settled nearby, in Chapel End in the hamlet of Hartshill, and can be found in the 1841 Census, with their first four children.  Edwin was working as a blacksmith, and the census shows he was not born in the county of Warwick [he was born in Nottingham].  

Susanna and Edwin had the following children, born in Hartshill:
  1.  Josiah, b. 1829
  2.  James, b. 1833
  3.  Susanna, b. 1835
  4.  Sarah [direct ancestor], b. 25 Sep 1836, d. 23 Oct 1908; m. to John PERRY 15 Apr 1860, 9 children
  5.  Hannah, b. 1842
  6.  Philip, b. 1847
  7.  Isabella, b. 1852

Note that I have not completed research to find spouses/families of their 7 children, other than for the direct ancestor, Sarah; plus I need to search for death records, and any other records which might be found on this WHITE family. 

In the 1851 Census, the family were again found living in Snow Hill, two homes away from Susanna's brother Richard and his family.  Edwin's occupation is listed as Blacksmith, as are his eldest sons, Josiah and James. However, Susanna is listed as a Hand Loom Weaver Ribbons, as are her two older daughters, Susannah and Sarah.  Her younger brother and his wife are also Ribbon Weavers, as is a neighbour.  Another neighbour woman is listed as having the occupation of Silk Winder.  
Ribbons.  Woven on a handloom, in whatever light could be found through a window, or with a small light.  You cannot read a Regency romance novel without reading about women buying ribbons to decorate their hats, their hair, their dresses. The northern area in Warwick produced ribbons for the fashion trade, originally for the wealthy, but now produced in large enough amounts to be within the price range of most women.  Over 30,000 hand looms were known to be working in the region, doing piecework at home. 

As you can see from the photo, the loom is placed right up against the window for maximum light. To earn money, one would need to be weaving the patterns for as long as possible while the light held.  And the windows were not like today's double-glazed ones, with well-insulated walls.  

Unfortunately, by the late 1860s the advent of steam-powered looms collapsed the home-based hand loom ribbon businesses, causing great hardship, as well as poverty.  

The 1861 Census shows Edwin still working as a Blacksmith, and their daughter Hannah as a Ribbon Weaver, but there are fewer in the neighbourhood.  Susanna, his wife, does not show an occupation on this Census.  

The 1871 Census shows Edwin, widowed, Blacksmith, living only with his youngest child, Isabella, aged 19, no occupation.  They were living in Snow Hill as before.  

Susanna is shown as having died in the first quarter of 1866 (Jan-March), and the death was registered in Parish Mancetter, in Atherstone which is about 2.5 miles from Hartshill. 

I have a list of questions still about Susanna.  Clearly everyone pulled their weight in the family, and while raising seven living children, she also wove silk ribbons to add to the family income.  I wonder if a neighbour showed her how to do this work, and I wonder how much money they might have earned with each 'piece' (yards?)

A challenging life, a challenging time, as the Industrial Revolution hit the poor very hard. This family found a way, and Susanna certainly did her part.

If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I would love to learn more about my Perry grandchildren's ancestors. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.


Monday, May 11, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES. No. 17, Prosper : Charles Giles GRAVES, 1824-1902

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog, but based on Themes.  Number 16 was Live Long.  This week, number 17 theme is Prosper.  

Please note that photos are copyright to me, and may not be copied.  Contact me if you are a relative and wish me to send you a copy, or if you have information/corrections to offer.

The photo here may or may not be of Charles Giles GRAVES - but was with others who clearly were family members, part of a collage. 

Here's Charles Giles GRAVES - a "Gentleman," who lived "on his own means" - as the Censuses state as his Occupation; clearly a prosperous man. Charles Giles GRAVES was my second great-grandfather on my mother's mother's line.  

His father was Cornelius GRAVES (1783-1828) & Anna TREAT (1783-1866). From the Graves Family Association's records, (Gen. 166), Cornelius "...was a stone mason [who] removed to near Auburn New York, where he pursued farming and contracting, and furnished materials to build Auburn prison, and for locks on the Erie Canal."  Anna TREAT was the 2nd great-granddaughter to Governor Robert TREAT of Connecticut.

Charles was the 8th child of Cornelius & Anna, the youngest of 6 sons and 2 daughters, born 7 Mar 1824 in Jordan, Onondaga, NY.  Note he was only 4 years old when his father died.  His mother did not remarry.  

On 26 Sep 1850, in Syracuse, Onondaga, NY, he married "Hattie" Harriet Philena ORMSBEE (1827-1929).  Hattie was the eldest daughter, 2nd child, of Jacob ORMSBEE and Sabra TOWERS. Jacob was a successful contractor/builder in and around Syracuse. 

Charles and Hattie had the following children, born in Syracuse NY:

  1.  Lillian Adele, b. 25 Nov 1853, d. 5 Jan 1949 Syracuse; m. 11 Jul 1877 to
          Gabriel W. Wisner (lawyer); 4 children

  2.  Clara Augusta "Gussie" [ancestor], b. 5 Nov 1857, d. 30 Oct 1955,
          Pinellas FL;  m. 2 Oct 1879 to James "Grove" Grover TERWILLIGER;
          3 children [my line through eldest]

  3.  Florence Estelle, b. 3 Feb 1860, d. 6 Apr 1954 Tabor NJ; m. 6 Sep 1893 to
          Ernest F. Tyler (jeweller/business owner); 1 daughter.  She was called
          "Aunt Toto" by my mother.



From 1862 Jan 21 - 1863 Apr 18, he was a Second Lieutenant in COMPANY "C", 19th INFANTRY, New York.  He resigned out on April 18 1863.  

In the Syracuse region, he owned or was a partner in a number of mercantile businesses (Seager & Graves, e.g.), as well as in the early oil industry, and manufacturing of gas pipes. 

One month short of his 78th birthday, Charles G. GRAVES died at the family residence on Sunday, 4 Feb 1902, after struggling with pneumonia for two weeks, according to newspaper accounts.  He was survived by his wife, Hattie, and their three daughters, eight grandchildren.

He is buried (as is his wife) in the Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, Onondaga, NY, as can be seen on FindAGrave.

If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I would love to learn more about my ancestors. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES. No. 18, "Where There's A Will" - Widow Mary BUELL 1684

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog, but based on Themes. Last week, it was Prosper.  This week, the theme is Where There's A Will - and I chose this one.

Mary POST, wife of the Immigrant, William BUELL (1604/5-1681): her will is marvellous as it lists her married daughters.  Mary's birth is estimated to be about 1615/16 in Chesterton, Huntingdon, England; she married William BUELL on 18 Nov 1640 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut

William died 16 Nov 1681, aged 76, and his will is dated July 26, 1681.  His wife provided the estate inventory of £142. 2s 7d.  Mary died several years later, aged 69. They had 7 children that we are aware of, all born in Windsor, Connecticut: Samuel William, Mary, Sgt Peter, Hannah, Hepsibah, Sarah, Abigail (predeceased her mother)

Her will has been transcribed as follows, found in the collection "Hartford, Connecticut Probate Records, 1639-1700" on Ancestry.com, taken from "A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, Hartford District,1635-1700.Vol. I. n.p., 1906"; pages 219-220

   Buell, Widow Mary, Windsor. Died 1st September, 1684.  Invt.  £19-15-06.  
   Taken 11 October, 1684, by James Hilliard & Samuel Barber.  

Will dated 29 August, 1684.
I  Mary Buell, being very weak and nigh to death, but having my 
   natural Understanding, having some smale things to dispose of, my Will is 
   that my Eldest daughter Mary Mills shall have my Westcoate, Coat, & 
   that Hatt which was Sarah's, & 1 white linen apron, & 1 blue Apron 
   which it is woue; & the rest of my Wool & Linen Clothes I give to my 
   daughter Hannah Palmer, & my Hatt, & 1 pewter Platter, & 1 tin pann.  
   I give to my daughter Hepzibah Welles 6 yards of linen Cloth, & I give 
   to my gr. child Mary Palmer Wool Cloth to make her a Coat, & to my 
   gr. Child Sarah Palmer Wool Cloth for a Waste Coat, & the rest of 
   my Wool Cloth is to be divided between my daughters Mary & Hannah, 
   & the rest of my linen cloth is to be diuided between my two 
   daughters Mary and Hannah, & I give to my daughter Hannah 1 blue 
   apron, & that is all that I give to my daughter.
   (Will not signed)
Witnesses: James Hillier,   Mary X Hillier.

As you can see, her several daughters are the only persons receiving her goods; the two sons having been given land and other properties and goods from their father when he died 23 Nov 1681. 

The best thing about a will is that if it names the married daughters, giving their married surnames.  Abigail Buell, the youngest daughter, died in late 1681, aged 25 yrs, apparently not married.  The next youngest daughter, Sarah Buell, is said to have lived to 1734, but I have yet to find out if she married, or where she lived. It is possible she left the area, with the clue in the fourth line above - "that Hatt which was Sarah's"  This confusion has yet to be clarified.

Don't you love wills?  I find myself wondering why certain daughters receive some items.  
- And why only 2 of the Palmer grandchildren received cloth, no other grandchildren?  
- Her eldest daughter Mary married Simon Mills and had 11 children (several dying early) before 1678.  
- Hannah married [Fenner or] Timothy Palmer and had 9 children.  
- Hepzibah married Thomas Welles and had 8 children. 
- Samuel [my ancestor] had 12 children with Deborah Griswold.   
- Youngest son, Peter, married three times, first with Martha Cozzens, third with Mary Bissell; a second wife died soon after marriage; he had a grand total of 13 children.  

With wills from both Mary and William BUELL - or BEWELL, as it is spelled in his will of 1681, details of the family, confirmation of names and marriages, are very helpful.  I need to go looking for more wills, and eventually clear up the mystery of what happened to Sarah Buell (b. 1653). 

If you have more information or questions, contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I would love to learn more about these ancestors.

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You truly make my day.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 16, LIVE LONG: Harriet "Hattie" Philena ORMSBEE

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog, but based on Themes. Last week, it was How Do You Spell That?  This week, the theme is LIVE LONG.   
Please note that photos are copyright to me, and may not be copied.  Contact me if you are a relative and wish me to send you a copy.

In the above photo, taken the summer of 1924, from the left:  great-grandmother, Clara Augusta "Gussie" GRAVES Terwilliger (67 yrs), Harriet "Hattie" Philena ORMSBEE Graves (97 yrs), my mother Mary (2 yrs), and my grandmother, Marguerite TERWILLIGER Kuhn (44 yrs).  All but my mother were long-lived: Clara lived to be 98, Harriet to 102, my mother to 70 (cancer/dementia), and Marguerite to 93 yrs (cancer).  Harriet's three girls all lived over 90 years.

I have a few long-lived ancestors, but the closest one is my maternal great-great-grandmother, Harriet "Hattie" Philena ORMSBEE. 102 years. Her middle name is sometimes seen as Philomena; sometimes she is named as "HP" as a nickname.

Hattie was the second child of Jacob ORMSBEE & Sabra TOWERS, born 28 May 1827, in Manlius, Onondaga, New York.  On 26 Sep 1850, she married a wealthy businessman, Charles Giles GRAVES, in Syracuse, Onondaga, NY. 

She and Charles lived in the village of Jordan, in the area of Syracuse for much of her life, moving to Englewood New Jersey after her husband died in 1902.  Her daughter Clara and husband James Grover "Grove" TERWILLIGER lived in Englewood, and the extended family lived together. I have a typewritten transcribed memoir from my grandmother, describing the beautiful home in Englewood NJ where she grew up. 

Hattie & Charles had 3 girls, born in Jordan, Onondaga, NY, just outside Syracuse:
  1. Lillian Adele, b 25 Nov 1853, d 5 Jan 1949 aged 95; m 11 Jul 1877 to Gabriel W. Wisner; children - Charles Kenneth, Florence "Ethel" Sheridan, John Lawrence, Rae Burton.
  2. Clara Augusta "Gussie" [ancestor], b 5 Nov 1857, d 30 Oct 1955 aged 6 days short of 98; m 2 Oct 1879 to James Grover "Grove" TERWILLIGER; children - Marguerite Josephine [ancestor], [m. Charles Edward KUHN]; George Walter m. Hazel Belle Hubbard; Harold "Hal" Graves m. Carola Bischoff.
  3. Florence Estelle, b 3 Feb 1860, d. 6 Apr 1954 aged 94;  m. 6 Sep 1893 to Ernest F. Tyler; children - Lillian G. [m. Tony Petrucelli]
Hattie lived with her daughter Clara after Charles GRAVES died in 1902; and continued until her own death 20 Aug 1929 in Englewood NJ.  She seems to have had quite a social life, enjoying musical activities, as did her daughters.  My grandmother played the piano, the organ, sang, and enjoyed live theatre (acting as well as in the audience), and it seems the family all enjoyed these activities.  

I do wish I had more photos to share of the ORMSBEE, GRAVES and TERWILLIGER families. Unfortunately at least one or two of their several large family albums had been in the care of an aunt, Dorthea Kuhn, who became demented and needed hospitalization in New York City. Somehow in the chaos of closing down her apartment and Dot going into care, Dot's large albums were... lost... and only a tiny WW2 album was saved.  Perhaps "someone" in the family still has a few photos. Wouldn't it be lovely if a cousin saw this post and contacted me?  I would be thrilled! 

If any of these people are your ancestors as well, please contact me via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  I would love to learn more about my ancestors. 

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You make my day.


Tuesday, April 14, 2015

52 ANCESTORS, 52 THEMES, No. 15: "How Do You Spell That?" SPELLING VARIANTS

This year's challenge by Amy Crow is another weekly blog, but based on Themes. Last week, it was Favourite Photo, and this week the theme is about spelling: How Do You Spell That?  

Until I married, I constantly had to spell my full name - every time.  Every year at school, every time I gave my name to any individual, teacher, secretary, friend.  I had to spell "Celia Gillespie."  Celia became CeCelia, Cecilia, Cecile, Cisily or variants, I even got 'Silly' from one confused teacher. GILLESPIE became Gilesbey, Glaspy, Glaspie, Glasby, Gilaspy, Gilezpe, and oh-so-many variants. At one point I had 22 of them, mostly from digging through parish registers. 

As a result, when I started to research my family, it felt perfectly natural to EXPECT variants in spelling, particularly with individuals pre-1840 or thereabouts. 

I used to write out as many variants as I could think of for a surname based on the sound, or on the linguistic changes ("lenition") of a change in consonant (b to v, e.g.), or based on sloppy handwriting.  With messy writing, it can have so many additional misspellings. Is that a T or an F or an I -?  an L, an S, a G -?  After the initial letter, is that an e, i, o, or even a u or v -?  m, n, u or w -?  Really, it's definitely an art to learn how to read early handwriting!  

Here are my favourite badly-spelled surnames [direct ancestors], once we get past my own original surname, GILLESPIE:

PETTYGROVE.  - Looks relatively easy to my eyes, but early forms were usually some variant of PETTIGREW.  It can be spelled with variants: two t's or one, 'grow' or 'grew' or 'grove', with an 'i' or a 'y' after pett.  Etc.  Definitely, "etc." 

TERWILLIGER.  - There are so many spellings for this 'made-in-America' surname, made up by a family in New Netherlands [which became New York when the British took over the Dutch colony]. The Dutch used the patronymic pattern of naming, but the British imposed a more formal surname requirement. Early variants of this family were 'Der Villig"  "Ter Vilig"  "van Der Villiger" (hard 'g' by the way). On the RootsWeb Terwilliger Surname Research Center website, there are 17 variants listed for this surname.  A surname which has only been extant for about 300 years.  

MEIGS - or is it MEGGS or MEGS or MEEGS?  - Actually, the first known Meggs in North America was a Vincent Meggs, who was also known as "LOVE", just to confuse the issue. One of his sons in Connecticut, John, started using the spelling MEIGS for some unknown reason.  And here we are now... 

PIERSOL - or is it Pearsall... or, variants.  Again, I've seen it spelled many ways. There's always a P, an R, an S and an L.  That is, all the consonants are included - but with variants of vowels, probably depending on the accent of the speaker or the ears of the listener.

Some interesting FIRST  names:  
TALIAFERRO Craig b. 1704 Virginia to Jane Craig and a man with surname Taliaferro or however it was spelled - which became TOLIVER in the next generation. 

ZERUBBABEL Jerome b. 1715 in Windham CT.  This one took me a little while to figure out how to say it, let alone spell it!  Truly, how could a parent look at a sweet little boy and say, "Let's call him Zerubbabel."  Boggles my mind.  This is my absolutely hands-down favourite first name. But I don't think any of my grandchildren will name any of their own children with this name, do you?

Although I am quite a good speller, I have never had a negative opinion about 'bad' spelling. The purpose of writing any words down is to ensure the purpose of the written communication will continue to be understood by any person looking at it.  Makes me want to go back to pictograms!  Thinking there is only one way to spell is a rather recent issue, and you may well find legal documents in the 1700s and even into the 1800s using a variety of spellings for an individual in only one document.  Perfectly normal, perfectly legal. Here's a link to a quick guide to the history of the English language. Scroll down to look at the various charts further down the page. That should keep anyone busy for a while!  

If any of these surnames are in your family, do let me know, and I'm happy to share what I can with you. And if there are comments or questions, please connect with me via calewis dot net or in the Comments below, and I will do my best to get back to you.  

Blogger is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason.  If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You make my day.

Welcome!

Family, friends, and others - I hope you enjoy these pages about our ancestors and their lives. Genealogy has become somewhat of an obsession, more than a hobby, and definitely a wonderful mystery to dig into and discover. Enjoy my writing, and contact me at celia.winky at gmail dot com if you have anything to add to the stories. ... Celia Lewis